The huntress of dirty bombs

The huntress of dirty bombs

It’s late in the day when Amaryllis Fox is admitted to a small nondescript apartment in the largest city in Pakistan, the metropolis of Karachi. The guy sitting on the sofa who had been awaiting her cordially offers her a cup of tea. She is sure: This is the man she had been monitoring for months now. He’s a member of a terrorist cell suspected of planning to release a”dirty” radioactive bomb that could cause tremendous disruption, maybe utter mass destruction…
Amaryllis Fox was born in New York in 1980, the daughter of a British celebrity and an American economist. The family moved frequently for her father’s job, residing in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the former Soviet Union. After high school she decided to study international law at Oxford, but one year before her alliance the attacks of September 11, 2001, awakened a deep interest in the phenomenon of terrorism. Soon she had been working for the service as a political and terror analyst, even as she was finishing her Georgetown master’s degree. She had also completed an agency operations training program, and in 22 she became one of the youngest female CIA officers. Assuming the identity of an art dealer, she set out to recruit arms traders as resources. Background: Following the collapse of the Soviet Union, substances that disappeared from the former empire’s military bases could be used to create nuclear weapons. So among the young broker’s missions was to locate”dirty” bombs and make certain they’d never be used. Her key strategy:”The only real way to disarm your enemy is to listen to them.” That potent certainty could finally save thousands of lives on this afternoon in the flat in Karachi…
Amaryllis understands the man offering her tea is not working alone. If she were to threaten him or resort to force, the remaining terrorist cell would execute the planned assault anyhow. Her best hope: use empathy and the ability of words. Amaryllis had spent years analyzing the profile of terrorists, and the moment has come to put these research to good use. When she saw the man on the couch, she had been surprised to see him holding an infant who appeared to be asthmatic. In response, she’d given the man a jar of clove oil she kept available for her daughter. When she’d later learned that the attack had not occurred, she wondered whether that instant of bonding had softened the guy’s heart. “I thought of this wheezing baby as well as her dad making decisions to shield her, whether from pollution or drone strikes.
The sole way to disarm your enemy would be to listen to them.
Most of us think we’re the fantastic guy, and in ways we actually are.” She never did ascertain the identities of the man’s accomplices. The important issue is that the bomb never went away. At some point she’d started to wonder if the psychological and physical strain of being a spy was actually worth it. Amaryllis now functions as a networking analyst specializing in global affairs and appears on news outlets such as CNN and the BBC. But what happened to that dirty bomb and people who were planning to detonate it remains a tightly held secret of the CIA.

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