Games jostle for supremacy in British political thriller COBRA

Games jostle for supremacy in British political thriller COBRA

In the dog-eat-dog world of authorities amid political catastrophe.
“What comes across in this play is the way much everybody’s out for you,” Carlyle explains. “It does not matter what you are going through at the moment. It does not matter what your personal lifestyle is like. They are out to get you. There are many, many individuals seeking to climb the greasy pole and they are willing to do anything to clamber over you.”
This lively, as well as more private difficulties, provides the meat of this drama.
“Even though there is a solar storm and plane crashes and all that type of stuff, it’s quite much character-driven,” adds Carlyle. “You’ll see that Sutherland has this horrible sadness for what his daughter is experiencing. He is a prime minister, but he is still a dad. I really love that portion of it, since I have a girl myself and I could understand , in the end of the day, that is all that matters for you.”
One individual Sutherland can rely on is his faithful, smart Chief of Staff Anna Marshall (Victoria Hamilton), who’s determined to shield him from the Home Secretary.
“You fulfill the Prime Minister and his Chief of Staff at a point of huge catastrophe where, not only do they have to make virtually impossible political conclusions, but they are also attempting to control and maintain their family life and their private relationships,” notes Hamilton.
“It’s a race against time to rescue the nation from this dreadful geographical event and its consequences. But I believe COBRA is as much a study of what being in positions of power does to their own lives as it’s obviously a fantastic thriller.”

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